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Islands, Iceland & Ireland…! Are All The Names Of Same Thing?

The words Iceland, Islands and Ireland maybe have been much confusing for many of us as they have much similarity in their spellings and sound. But actually all of them have completely different meaning. Before discussing difference b/w them, firstly, difference b/w common noun and proper noun must be understood.

Islands, Iceland & Ireland…! Are All The Names Of Same Thing?

Island

Island (sometimes also named as isle) is a part of land that if fully surrounded by water from all sides. An island maybe very small or big. Islands can exist in lakes, rivers or even sea. Any dry portion of land, that has water, surrounding it, is an island. The alphabet “s” is silent in island word, it is pronounced as “i-land”, with stress on 1st syllable. The largest island of the world is Greenland. However many other islands also exist, with various sizes.

Even artificial islands also exist. Almost all of the islands on Earth are natural and have been formed by volcanic eruptions or tectonic forces. Artificial islands, however, still exist, such as the island on which Kansai International Airport is situated in Osaka Bay off the Japanese island of Honshu. Artificial islands can be created using natural materials (e.g. soil, rock, or sand) or artificial ones (e.g. concrete slabs or recycled waste).Natural islands are also artificially expanded, such as Vasilyevsky Island in the Russian city of St. Petersburg, which in the building of the Passenger Port of St. Petersburg extended its western shore westward by some 0.5 km.

Islands, Iceland & Ireland…! Are All The Names Of Same Thing?

Islands are of 2 types: oceanic and continental islands.

Oceanic islands

Oceanic islands are islands that do not rest on continental shelves. The overwhelming majority, such as Saint Helena in the South Atlantic Ocean, are volcanic in origin. The few oceanic islands that are not volcanic are tectonic in origin and occur where the ocean floor above the surface has been raised by plate movements. Saint Peter and Paul Rocks in the Atlantic Ocean and Macquarie Island in the Pacific are examples of this.

Islands, Iceland & Ireland…! Are All The Names Of Same Thing?

Volcanic Islands

ARCS

In a volcanic island arc, one form of volcanic oceanic island is found. These islands come from volcanoes where there is the subduction of one plate under another. The Aleutian Islands, the Mariana Islands and most of Tonga in the Pacific Ocean are its examples. Some of the Lesser Antilles and the South Sandwich Islands are the only examples in the Atlantic Ocean.

Islands, Iceland & Ireland…! Are All The Names Of Same Thing?

Oceanic Rifts

Another kind of volcanic oceanic island takes place where the surface is hit by an oceanic rift. Two examples exist: Iceland, which is the second largest volcanic island in the world, and Jan Mayen. They’re both in the Atlantic.

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Hotspots

Over volcanic hotspots a third type of volcanic oceanic island is formed. Relative to the shifting tectonic plate above it, a hotspot is more or less stationary, so a chain of islands results as the plate drifts. This type of island is gradually “drowned” by iso-static change and eroded over long periods of time, becoming a seamount.

Islands, Iceland & Ireland…! Are All The Names Of Same Thing?

Atolls

An atoll is an island formed from a coral reef that has developed on a volcanic island which has been eroded and submerged. The reef rises up to the water’s surface and forms a new island. Usually, atolls are ring-shaped with a central lagoon. The Line Islands in the Pacific and the Maldives in the Indian Ocean are examples.

Islands, Iceland & Ireland…! Are All The Names Of Same Thing?

Continental islands

Continental islands are land bodies that lie on a continental shelf. Its Examples include Borneo, Java, Sumatra, Sakhalin, Taiwan and Hainan off Asia; New Guinea, Tasmania, and Kangaroo Island off Australia; Great Britain, Ireland, and Sicily off Europe; Greenland, Newfoundland and many more.

Islands, Iceland & Ireland…! Are All The Names Of Same Thing?

Micro-continental islands

A type of Continental Island is the micro-continental island. It is formed when a continent is fully rifted. Examples of Micro-continental islands include Madagascar and Socotra off Africa, New Caledonia, New Zealand, and some of the Seychelles.

Bars

It is a subtype of an island that is formed by deposition of tiny rocks where water current loses some of its carrying capacity. This includes barrier islands, which are accumulations of sand deposited on continental shelves by sea waves, fluvial or alluvial islands created within major rivers in river deltas or midstream. Although some are transitory and can vanish if the current shifts in volume or speed, others are durable and long-lived.

Iceland

Iceland (the land of fire and ice) is the name of country that is also named as “republic of Iceland”. But interestingly, Iceland is also an island, as it is surrounded by water. Iceland is 2nd largest island. It is pronounced as “ais-land” with stress on 1st syllable.

Islands, Iceland & Ireland…! Are All The Names Of Same Thing?

Iceland is a country in north Atlantic with 360390 population. It is the most lightly populated country of the Europe. Its capital is Reykjavik. Over the past few years, Iceland has become a popular travel destination. Iceland is at the juncture of the Arctic and the North Atlantic Oceans. The main island is situated completely south of the Arctic Circle, passing through the tiny Icelandic island of Grímsey off the northern coast of the main island.

Islands, Iceland & Ireland…! Are All The Names Of Same Thing?

Iceland is the 18th largest island in the world and the 2nd largest island in Europe, after Great Britain. The capital, Reykjavik contains more than 60 percent of the total Icelandic population. The last place on earth to be inhabited by humans was Iceland. Glaciers cover about 11 percent of Iceland. Red, white& blue are the national colors there. The Northern Lights can be easily seen from September to March in Iceland.

Ireland

Ireland is also an island which is in the west of britian. It has 2 political units. 1st is republic of Ireland, also known as Eire. This country covers about 80% of the island of Ireland. 2nd is Northern Ireland, covering about 20% of Ireland’s island. Politically, it is the part of UK. It is pronounced as “aier-land”, with stress on 1st syllable. Ireland is basically divided b/w Republic of Ireland (which is officially named as Ireland), covering five-6th of the island, and Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom.

Islands, Iceland & Ireland…! Are All The Names Of Same Thing?

Christmas is a very big festival in Ireland, much as it is in the UK and the United States. Christmas in Ireland traditionally runs from Christmas Eve (24 December) to the Feast of Epiphany (6 January) and many Irish rituals come with it. When it comes to Christmas, Irish people have their own unique rituals and customs. Irish culture, especially in the field of literature, has had an important influence on other cultures. As reflected through Gaelic sports, Irish music and the Irish language, a strong indigenous culture exists alongside mainstream Western culture. The culture of the island shares many aspects, including the English language and sports such as association football, rugby, horse racing, and golf, with that of Great Britain.

Islands, Iceland & Ireland…! Are All The Names Of Same Thing?

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